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Surgery has gone a long way, but still has dangers

| Sep 15, 2016 | Medical Malpractice |

Surgery has been around for a very long time. However, what surgery looks like, and the level of risk associated with it, has changed greatly over the years.

Surgical procedures were once rather primitive things. Take Civil-War-era surgeries for example. These procedures were often bloody and painful affairs, with risks of infection and other harms being particularly high. A good portion of such surgeries resulted in fatalities.

Since that time, all sorts of key developments have occurred in surgical practices and medicine that have made surgeries a much safer and less harrowing form of treatment. Some examples of the more major and fundamental ones are:

  • The use of antiseptics in surgeries.
  • Antibiotics.
  • Effective anesthetics.
  • Blood-loss prevention medications.

However, even with all of these developments and improvements, risks do remain when it comes to surgeries. Things can still go wrong during a surgical procedure. Also, there is still the possibility of a surgery resulting in an infection or other complications. These risks can be substantially increased when a surgeon acts negligently. So, having all these surgical advancements isn’t enough by itself; surgeons making sure they are using the tools and methods they have available to them in a proper manner is a key part of keeping surgical patients as safe as possible.

As one can see, it remains the case that when surgeons make mistakes, patients can pay dearly. Skilled medical malpractice attorneys can provide guidance on compensation matters to patients here in Louisiana who have been harmed by a surgeon’s negligence.

Source: Medical Daily, “Surgery Before Antiseptics: Gruesome, Bloody And Often Fatal,” Ed Cara, Sept. 14, 2016